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The Kyocera Museum of Art to Feature Special Exhibition
“Court Culture in Early-Modern Kyoto: Scenes of Court Enthronement Culture”

Precious pieces on display together for the first time in 40 years

August 31, 2016
THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE FOR THE EXHIBITION
OF COURT CULTURE IN EARLY-MODERN KYOTO
KYOCERA CORPORATION
JONANGU SHRINE
The Executive Committee for the Exhibition of Court Culture in Early-Modern Kyoto is pleased to announce the opening of the "Exhibition of Court Culture in Early-Modern Kyoto: Scenes of Court Enthronement Culture" with special cooperation by Kyocera Corporation and Jonangu Shrine. The exhibition will open on September 10, 2016 (Sat) simultaneously at the Kyocera Museum of Art and at the Jonangu Saikan building, and end on October 23, 2016 (Sun) at the Jonangu Saikan and on November 13, 2016 (Sun) at the Kyocera Museum of Art.

Since the Heian capital was established in 794, the imperial court has cultivated a graceful tradition as a cultural hub. The essence of the court culture culminates in the enthronement of the Emperor and the Daijo-sai (Great Food Offering Festival). The series of these rituals is known as Tairei or Taiten (state ceremony).

At the Exhibition, some 60 articles will be on display, including pieces from the Ohara Family Collection related to state rituals since the early-modern period, precious items held by private collectors, and articles pertaining to Tofukumon-in (Tokugawa Masako) who was the daughter of Tokugawa Hidetada and who as a consort of Emperor Gomizunoo, served as a bridge linking the imperial court and the Tokugawa government and helped maintain the high standards of the court culture.

A public exhibition of this scale and quality was last held 40 years ago in 1976 at the Kyoto Bunkaten Exhibition. Through the exhibition, visitors will be able to understand and appreciate the supreme beauty and elegance of the court culture that has been passed on to our times.


Oharake-bunko's "Pictures of the Daijosai (Great Food Offering Ceremony)"
(Courtesy: The Museum of Shinto and Japanese Culture Kogakkan University)
Exhibited at The Kyocera Museum of Art

Tofukumon-in (Tokugawa Masako) statue
(Courtesy: Koun-ji Temple)
Exhibited at The Kyocera Museum of Art


Miniature settings for the enthronement ceremony
that takes place in Shishinden (Throne Hall) and Nantei (South Garden)
(Courtesy: Religious Culture Institute, a general incorporated foundation)
Exhibited at Jonangu Saikan


Main Exhibits at The Kyocera Museum of Art and Jonangu Saikan Building
On display at the Kyocera Museum of Art will be the precious items of the state ceremony from the Ohara Family Collection and articles pertaining to Emperor consort Tofukumon-in. At the Jonangu Saikan building, visitors will be able to look at a miniature model of the setting for the state ceremony as well as the ceremonial costumes and ritual articles. Through the combination of both exhibitions, visitors will be drawn into the solemnity of the state ceremony, which is performed only when a new Emperor is enthroned.

Oharake-bunko's "a panorama view of
the Kyoto Imperial Palace and
the Enthronement Ceremony Hall

Takamikura (Imperial Throne)
at Shishinden (replica)

Ceremonial dress for civil and
government official
(Courtesy: The Museum of Shinto and Japanese Culture Kogakkan University)
Exhibited at The Kyocera Museum of Art
(Courtesy: Religious Culture Institute,
a general incorporated foundation)
Exhibited at Jonangu Saikan


Overview of Exhibition   
Exhibition
Title
The Kyocera Museum of Art: 2016 Autumn Special Exhibition
"Court Culture in Early-Modern Kyoto: Scenes of Court Enthronement Culture"
Dates1) September 10 (Sat) through November 13 (Sun), 2016
2) September 10 (Sat) through October 23 (Sun), 2016
Locations1) The Kyocera Museum of Art
(Kyocera Corporation Global Head Office, 1st floor)
6 Takeda Tobadono-cho, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto City, Japan 612-8501
Access: http://global.kyocera.com/company/csr/others/headquarter/index.html
2) Jonangu Saikan
7 Nakajima Tobarikyu-cho, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto City, Japan 612-8459
Hours1) 10:00am to 5:00pm (last admission at 4:30pm)
2) 9:00am to 4:30pm (last admission at 4:00pm)
AdmissionFree at both venues
HostThe Executive Committee for the Exhibition of Court Culture in Early-Modern Kyoto
Chairman of the Executive Committee: Dr. Isao Tokoro
Professor Emeritus, Kyoto Sangyo University
Professor, The Institute of Moralogy
AuspicesKyoto City, The Kyoto Shimbun, Kyoto Jinjacho
Special CooperationKyocera Corporation, Jonangu Shrine, Koun-ji Temple


Greeting from Isao Tokoro, Chairman of the Executive Committee
In the area of Fushimi, where the exhibitions will be held, one can also find the tombs of Emperor Kanmu, who established the Heian capital (today's Kyoto), and Emperor Meiji, who had a strong attachment to Kyoto. The towns of Toba and Takeda, in particular, are where retired Emperors Shirakawa and Toba had their imperial villas (Toba Palace and Toba Detached Palace) in the late Heian Period. At the villas, imperial visits were received and gorgeous banquets were held. This is indeed a historically important place where the dynastic culture flourished. I sincerely hope that visitors will reflect upon the long history of the Imperial House while appreciating the significance of the long-preserved, graceful ceremonies and the splendor of the imperial court culture.


About The Kyocera Museum of Art
The Museum, located on the first floor of Kyocera's Head Office in Kyoto, Japan, was opened in October 1998 as one of Kyocera Corporation's cultural projects. Through its exhibits, Kyocera hopes to make a contribution to the cultural enrichment of the local community. The Museum's major collections include Qianlong glassware, Picasso's copper plate print series 347, modern Japanese paintings, Western-style paintings, sculptures, and fine ceramic pottery. Special Exhibitions have been held on a regular basis at the Museum, with this exhibition marking the 17th anniversary. Since opening, the Museum has received approximately 240,000 visitors (as of July 2016).

About Jonangu Shrine
Jonangu was built in 794 in the south of the newly established capital, Heian-kyo (today's Kyoto) to protect the capital and ensure the nation's peace. For over 1,200 years, it has been known as the 'Grand Shrine of Directions.' In the late Heian Period, retired Emperors Shirakawa and Toba built the Jonan villas (Toba Detached Palace) around Jonangu and used them to exercise their cloistered rule. Jonangu was worshiped as the protector of the villas against evils and Jonan festival was an important event. In present times, as the guardian of construction, relocation and house physiognomy, Jonangu continues to attract worshipers from around Japan seeking directional protection against misfortune and purification of automobiles. Jonangu's sacred garden is best-known for the Kyokusui-no-Utage, a Heian-style poetry-composition event. It is also famous for its weeping plum trees and in September and October is beautifully filled with bush clovers, chrysanthemums, Japanese gentians and other autumn plants.