Feature Article No.1: Contributing to the Advancement and Development of Humankind through Fine Ceramic Technology

Japan
 
Fine ceramics have unlimited potential as materials for a new age. Kyocera is contributing to global environmental protection and the advancement of society by expanding use of fine ceramic materials in diverse industries.
 
Continuously creating the new value which is demanded around the world in every field, from daily-use to advanced industrial applications Kyocera receives an award for its contribution to the asteroid exploration spacecraft, Hayabusa Pressure-resistant vessel supports ocean-bottom seismographs at a depth of 11,000 meters
Large-scale ceramic structure to achieve 10-fold performance increase in Subaru Telescope Large-diameter, high-purity ceramic ring, needed in the development of a next-generation energy source Ceramic mounting wafer is the key to raising LED performance and lowering cost
 
Large-scale ceramic structure to achieve 10-fold performance increase in Subaru Telescope
Located at the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii, the Subaru Telescope is a large-scale optical-infrared telescope run by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. Kyocera participated in a project to achieve a 10-fold increase in performance of the telescope.

The Subaru Telescope has a reflector with a diameter of 8.5 meters and an optical lens. The optical system is calibrated for high accuracy, and to maintain stability of the system, Kyocera developed a cordierite with superior performance. In its original state, cordierite is porous and has low strength - use as a structural material was therefore limited. Kyocera developed a cordierite featuring density and high strength, as well as a coefficient of thermal expansion approaching zero. We completed a sintered unit with a diameter of 970mm. The lens barrel containing this large-scale ceramic structural unit has a maximum diameter of about one meter and total length of 1.7 meters. It is to be installed in the Subaru Telescope later this year as part of an ultra-wide-angle camera.
Photo:Optical lens Photo by Todai Institute for Advanced Studies, The University of Tokyo Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe
Optical lens
Photo by Todai Institute for Advanced Studies, The University of Tokyo Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe

Photo:Cordierite components of the lens barrel
Cordierite components of the lens barrel


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