FINE CERAMICS WORLD
Introduction to Fine Ceramics
Characteristics of Fine Ceramics
Learning About Fine Ceramics
Part 1: What Makes Fine Ceramic Knives so Special?
Part 2: Which Part Uses Fine Ceramics?
Part 3: Fine Ceramics Inside the Body
Part 4: Decorative Fine Ceramic
Part 5: Fine Ceramics at Work in the Deep Sea
Part 6: Fine Ceramics at Work in Space
Part 7: Fine Ceramics Opening Up Opportunities for New Types of Energy
Fine Ceramics in Daily Life
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  HOME > Learning About Fine Ceramics > Part 5: Fine Ceramics at Work in the Deep Sea 
Learning About Fine Ceramics
Part 5: Fine Ceramics at Work in the Deep Sea

Fine Ceramic Materials Play an Important Role in Submarine Earthquake Observation
Silicon nitride, a Fine Ceramic material, exhibits characteristic features of high compressive strength, corrosion resistance and low specific density in its use for submarine pressure-resistant containers.

Conventionally, pressure-resistant containers have been made of glass -- which cannot withstand the same depth as containers made of silicon nitride. Using Fine Ceramics (also known as "advanced ceramics") has allowed the installation of a seismograph at a sea depth of 11,000 meters (36,089 feet) in the Mariana Trench, which is believed to be the world's deepest.
Photo:Self-Surfacing Ocean Bottom seismograph Photo:Self-Surfacing Ocean Bottom seismograph
Photo: Nippon Marine Enterprises, Ltd. Photo: Courtesy of Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)

Self-Surfacing Ocean Bottom Seismograph
The self-surfacing ocean bottom seismograph records seismic movement on the bottom of the sea. Once measurements are taken the main body separates from the weight device and floats to the surface where it is collected so the data can be analyzed.
Some ocean bottom seismographs have their seismic data recorders placed in high-pressure-resistant glass containers. Measurement of seismic data in a deeper sea, requires higher resistance to pressure, thus an increase in use of ceramic containers for this application is expected in the future.
Photo: Courtesy of Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)
*Image shows ceramic container.

Comparison of Strength and Specific Density Between Fine Ceramics and Metals
image: Comparison of Strength and Specific Density between Fine Ceramics and Metals
*The values in the graphs are for reference purposes only.
Data: Courtesy of Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)
The graphs above show comparisons of silicon nitride, alumina, high-strength stainless steel and titanium alloy; confirming the higher compressive strength and lower specific density of Fine Ceramics to those of metals.
See "Characteristic - Specific Density" for more details
See "Characteristic - Strength" for more details

Part 1: What Makes Fine Ceramic Knives so Special? Part 2: Which Part Uses Fine Ceramics? Part 3: Fine Ceramics Inside the Body
Part 4: Decorative Fine Ceramics   Part 5: Fine Ceramics at Work in the Deep Sea   Part 6: Fine Ceramics at Work in Space
Part 7: Fine Ceramics Opening Up Opportunities for New Types of Energy        

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The term "Fine Ceramics" is interchangeable with "advanced ceramics," "technical ceramics" and "engineered ceramics." Use varies by region and industry.
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